(((Read Book))) ⇩ Gorkhas Imagined: Indra Bahadur Rai In Translation ⇰ PDF eBook or Kindle ePUB free

Beneath the translation jargons such as violence and hegemony and resistance, anxious readers are actually concerned only about one factor has the translated text done justice to the source This is the only true parameter of judging whether or not the translated text is worth reading And in the case of Gorkhas Imagined Indra Bahadur Rai in translation the anthology of litterateur Indra Bahadur Rai s writings one can happily say that the translations have made a superb effort to be hon Beneath the translation jargons such as violence and hegemony and resistance, anxious readers are actually concerned only about one factor has the translated text done justice to the source This is the only true parameter of judging whether or not the translated text is worth reading And in the case of Gorkhas Imagined Indra Bahadur Rai in translation the anthology of litterateur Indra Bahadur Rai s writings one can happily say that the translations have made a superb effort to be honest to the original Edited by Prem Poddar and Anmole Prasad, the anthology includes eight stories and two essays penned by Rai, openly acknowledged as one of the living legends of Nepali literature The writings have been picked out from various earlier collections and rendered into English by Michael Hutt, Dorjee Tshering Lepcha and Anmole Prasad himself And as the title of the present anthology implies, the writings explore and reveal the triumphs and tribulations of the Gorkhas a term used here most respectfully as a synonym of Nepali.In fact, the introduction by Prem Poddar, which clarifies that the word Gorkha is to be associated only with its positive connotations, has to be the most diplomatic and politically correct preface ever Even while maintaining its neutrality, it does manage to include a whole lot of information, and deserves special mention for that Beginning with the etymological significance of the word translation , Poddar takes readers through the virtual process of the selection, translation and adaptation of the writings Citing and quoting a horde of intellectuals ranging from Salman Rushdie to Homi Bhabha, Poddar not only inducts first timers to the diversity and range of Rai s works but also ably convinces readers of the fine balance translators must maintain to be faithful both to the target and the source.This sense of equilibrium can indeed be sensed quite acutely in some parts of the translation, where the translators have managed to turn the texts into English but retained Nepali touches in the form of khir , gundruk , sayapatri or malingo This is what lends the work its authenticity and the innate Nepaliness As almost all the Nepali texts are well known ones, some of them even incorporated into syllabi, reading them in English is almost like re reading them all over again Take for example The Storm Raged All Night , which talks about the hardships present in everyone s life, and how one has to learn to live with them While reading the text in Nepali, readers are first filled with despair at the natural calamity faced by the protagonists, but by the end, optimism has seeped in The translator, Michael Hutt, has been able to capture the oscillation of these disparate emotions experienced by a commonplace character, someone as normal as us In fact, all of the characters in Rai s tales of this anthology are everyday ones he has no need of or use for the superhero and the rich seductress Instead he talks of the downtrodden, the economically disadvantaged, and the displaced individuals If Maina s mother is just like us assimilates the jumbled thoughts of a spinach seller in typical Leela Lekhan for which the writer is rightly famous , Kheer talks touchingly about a group of laborers who gobble up sugary milk and rice while dreaming of the richest porridge The Ordinariness of a Day describes just that a typical day spent by a couple somewhere in a nondescript village.A bit different from the themes of day to life is the slightly abstract, subtly philosophical piece titled Light The author, in almost lyrical style, explains how, since the advent of electricity in his home, he was unable to write a thing And this is because the electricity looks down from above and hence there is no secret, no poetry The author is so believable about his creative need of the shadows that in the end, when he claims, I switched off the light, lit the lamp, and wrote this, one cannot but applaud.Particularly poignant is the tale Jaimaya Alone Arrived at Likhapani which takes readers through the journey of forcibly exiled migrants who travel from Burma to India Famine, illness, penury and deaths are the difficulties that they encounter on the way And contrary to the uplifting climaxes of the other stories, none of the hearts of the handful of people who are finally able to reach their destination, felt the joy of the arrival The dejection and hopelessness of these ill fated ones goes straight to the heart And yet, after going through such touching tales, the single tale which keeps reverberating in the mind and the heart is the very first one Titled Jarr A Story that Happened It is a relatively simple yet passionate romantic yarn, andits very essence has been captured in translation It tells the tale of Thuli, who is forced to marry Harshajit while her true love is Rudramaan Then there is a cat and mouse chase between the husband and the jarr literally the other man which even includes a fight with a tiger in the midst A powerful story in Nepali, it evokes the same extreme reactions of goose pimples and shivers in English The translator has bravely retained a handful of Nepali words in each paragraph, which certainly increases affinity with native Nepali speakers, but could distance English language speakers from the tale I certainly would have resented an overdose of unfamiliar words thrust at me without any explanation whatsoever.The two essays included in the end prove a fitting finale to the Indo Nepalese venture In Indian Nepali Nationalism and Nepali Poetry , Rai provides a wealth of information on the subject, beginning right from Bhanubhakta His aim of collecting all Nepalese speakers under an umbrella of harmony can be visualized quite clearly even in this report like writing Hill and Streams further displays the poetic capabilities of the author In this essay, he divulges the anxieties and reservations of the Indo Nepalese community He makes it clear, though, that is nothing greater than him than his language, culture and heritage The best part about the translated texts is their flow At very few places do readers have to pause and rue that this is a mere translation Otherwise, the setting allows itself to be described very well in another language and characters slip into a foreign tongue as easily No high sounding words, no awkward replacements in fact, the translators seem to have deliberately chosen the simplest and yet most eloquent words as possible The scenario of remote villages, the lingos of the local people, even onomatopoeic words such as salala and kukhurika everything is brought alive Barring a few clumsy translations andthan a couple of typos, there is much to be praised in this slender volume that will allow a large number of non Nepali speaking readers to enjoy Indra Bahadur Rai s work as much as we have done for years (((Read Book))) ☠ Gorkhas Imagined: Indra Bahadur Rai In Translation ★ A collection ofstories andessays one of which is originally written in English by IB Rai