@DOWNLOAD EPUB Ù Act of War: Lyndon Johnson, North Korea, and the Capture of the Spy Ship Pueblo ô eBook or E-pub free

Great book clears up a lot of bad history about what happened to the captain and crew of the USS Pueblo that had been captured by the North Koreans in January 1968 The author has really done his homework and researched the facts as best as he could putting a whole new perspective on what really happened at the time of capture, while being held as prisoners by the North Koreans, and the Court of Inquiry once the crew was released. Cheevers brings to life a fascinating chapter in American history, one that was perhaps partially obscured by the panoply of events that happened in the same years This book reads like a great spy novel, except it is better because it actually happened @DOWNLOAD EPUB ð Act of War: Lyndon Johnson, North Korea, and the Capture of the Spy Ship Pueblo µ In , a small, dilapidated American spy ship set out on a dangerous mission to pinpoint military radar stations along the coast of North Korea Packed with advanced electronic surveillance equipment and classified intelligence documents, the USS Pueblo was poorly armed and lacked backup by air or sea Its crew, led by a charismatic, hard drinking ex submarine officer named Pete Bucher, was made up mostly of untested sailors in their teens and twentiesOn a frigid January morning while eavesdropping near the port of Wonsan, the Pueblo was challenged by a North Korean gunboat When Bucher tried to escape, his ship was quickly surrounded by patrol boats, shelled and machine gunned, and forced to surrender One American was killed and ten wounded, and Bucher and his young crew were taken prisoner by one of the world s most aggressive and erratic totalitarian regimesLess than forty eight hours before the Pueblo s capture, North Korean commandos had nearly succeeded in assassinating South Korea s president in downtown Seoul Together, the two explosive incidents pushed Cold War tensions toward a flashpoint as both North and South Korea girded for war with fifty thousand American soldiers caught between them President Lyndon Johnson rushed US combat ships and aircraft to reinforce South Korea, while secretly trying to negotiate a peaceful solution to the crisis Act of War tells the riveting saga of Bucher and his men as they struggled to survive merciless torture and horrendous living conditions in North Korean prisons Based on extensive interviews and numerous government documents released through the Freedom of Information Act, this book also reveals new details of Johnson s high risk gambit to prevent war from erupting on the Korean peninsula while his negotiators desperately tried to save the sailors from possible execution A dramatic tale of human endurance against the backdrop of an international diplomatic poker game, Act of War offers lessons on the perils of covert intelligence operations as America finds itself confronting a host of twenty first century enemies On January 23, 1968 the USS Pueblo, a lightly armed diminutive spy ship was boarded by heavily armed North Korean military near Wonsan and the American crewmen taken prisoner Jack Cheevers, a former Los Angeles Times political reporter, painstakingly and dramatically describes the seizure of the ship and crew and how close the United States came to becoming involved in a second Korean War On January 21, 1968 North Korean commandos had attempted the assassination of the South Korean President On January 23, 1968 the USS Pueblo, a lightly armed diminutive spy ship was boarded by heavily armed North Korean military near Wonsan and the American crewmen taken prisoner Jack Cheevers, a former Los Angeles Times political reporter, painstakingly and dramatically describes the seizure of the ship and crew and how close the United States came to becoming involved in a second Korean War On January 21, 1968 North Korean commandos had attempted the assassination of the South Korean President The USS Pueblo was never notified of this incident The author had done meticulous research including tracking down survivors for their stories.To avoid the potential war LBJ dispatched Cyrus R Vance to South Korea to negotiate Cheevers carefully tracks Vance s delicate mission For eleven months the Pueblo crew was regularly and savagely beaten, tortured and starved while negotiation to get them back was going on Cheever s reports that once freed the crew all suffered from a variety of mental and physical ailments A Navy psychiatrist diagnosed some of the crew member with Concentration Camp Syndrome A disorders that afflicted survivors of Hitler s death camps.The last part of the book deals with the Navy s inquiry of the incident The Court of Inquiry ordered a court marshal of Cmdr Lloyd Pete Bucher but the Secretary of the Navy dismissed it Bucher and crew had to fight for their reputation the rest of their lives Many years later, after a long fight by supporters, the crew was finally awarded the POW medal.This book tells an important and almost forgotten incident of the Cold War The book reads like a suspense military novel rather than a history book I read this as an audio book downloaded from Audible Jeffrey Kafer did an excellent job narrating the book Jack Cheevers focuses on a forgotten moment in the United States history focused on the USS Pueblo that was seized by North Korea while on a routine spy mission In the lead up to the Vietnam War the Navy began outfitting fishing trawlers as spy ships and sending them to listen to the radio transmissions off the coast of foreign powers like China and the Soviet Union IN addition to these communist adversaries the former enemy of North Korea was also trialed The ships were told to stay well int Jack Cheevers focuses on a forgotten moment in the United States history focused on the USS Pueblo that was seized by North Korea while on a routine spy mission In the lead up to the Vietnam War the Navy began outfitting fishing trawlers as spy ships and sending them to listen to the radio transmissions off the coast of foreign powers like China and the Soviet Union IN addition to these communist adversaries the former enemy of North Korea was also trialed The ships were told to stay well into international waters and the fear of reprisal on communist spy ships kept them safe Cheevers picks up the story of one of these fishing boats whose maiden voyage was to listen to North Korea s radio transmissions In addition to virtually no armaments beyond small guns and two mounted machine guns the Pueblo was loaded down with classified material and not nearly enough capacity to destroy it should the enemy engage and seize the ship Naturally like all perfectly planned military missions reality gets in the way and the North Koreans send out a sizable flotilla that overpowers the Pueblo What makes the case so shocking to the United States is that the commander of the Pueblo choose to surrender the ship without putting up a significant fights beyond trying to flee and saved the lives of his crewmen in doing so The ship is driven into a North Korean port where the men are held in a torture camp as prisoners of war and threatened with their lives to sign confession Eventually false confessions are signed and an international standoff occurs for the administration of LBJ Cheevers does an excellent job of balancing the plight of the captives with significant and gory details to the political ramifications of the administration in trying to free them The book details what happened to these men and the effects it had on them after the fact This includes the court of inquiry trial regarding the Pueblo and the eventual awarding of POW medals to the crew Overall the book is well written and covers an incident that is largely forgotten about in American history I was just in third grade when this happened and vaguely recall the whole drama, but have been aware that there was some sub current of controversy over the incident Was Bucher derelict Or was he a scapegoat Did he do the best he could under the circumstances, or was he too quick to give up the ship A lot of the old Navy hands it seems, come down hard on Bucher for surrendering the ship Plain old everyday people me among them have no issue with NOT trying to use small arms and a couple of I was just in third grade when this happened and vaguely recall the whole drama, but have been aware that there was some sub current of controversy over the incident Was Bucher derelict Or was he a scapegoat Did he do the best he could under the circumstances, or was he too quick to give up the ship A lot of the old Navy hands it seems, come down hard on Bucher for surrendering the ship Plain old everyday people me among them have no issue with NOT trying to use small arms and a couple of frozen deck mounted machine guns to attempt fighting off a flotilla of PT boats, a sub hunter that s shooting rockets, and two MIG fighter jets Once they were taken prisoner, he and the others endured months of hell while his government, afraid of pissing off the Russians who we were alreadyor less fighting in Vietnam basically sat around and twiddled it s collective thumb Then when they re finally freed, the navy basically put Bucher through the wringer at the Board of Inquiry which recommended court martials for him and a few others Thankfully, the defense secretary shot that down, but the pattern was set The fact that it literally took an act of congress to get the Pueblo crew POW medals over 25 years later says all that needs to be said about the Navy s attitude with the incident The admirals that made the decisions to send an under equipped ship into a situation they had clear warning could be suicide they kept their fancy desk jobs all the while Bucher and his crew were being tortured by the north koreans and shit on by the Navy Yeah, this book pissed me off a bit I m a sucker for anything to do with North Korea, and this story of the USS Pueblo, a spy ship that the Koreans attacked and confiscated from international waters in February 1968 The ship was woefully unprepared for the fallout of a possible capture also, the Navy was completely unprepared for an international waters attack and capture and it took almost a year to get the crew 82 soldiers and 1 corpse home This is the story of Captain Pete Bucher, his time with the Navy, and the details of I m a sucker for anything to do with North Korea, and this story of the USS Pueblo, a spy ship that the Koreans attacked and confiscated from international waters in February 1968 The ship was woefully unprepared for the fallout of a possible capture also, the Navy was completely unprepared for an international waters attack and capture and it took almost a year to get the crew 82 soldiers and 1 corpse home This is the story of Captain Pete Bucher, his time with the Navy, and the details of his experience as a detainee in a North Korean prison it rivals anything you would read in Unbroken Cheevers has interviewed many other crewmen, and had access to a lot of previously classified documents under the Freedom of Information Act, and overall I feel he gave a fairly balanced account, both from Bucher s perspective, and that of the Navy to be honest, though, I side with Bucher in every single point I got emotional several times as I learned about the physical and psychological torture that the Americans endured at the hands of their North Korean interrogators Because, technically, the nations were not at war with each other, the soldiers were not classified as POWs, they were It s still murky, actually The United States was fighting in Vietnam and losing both the actual battles and the publicity war in worldwide newspapers, both LBJ and Nixon struggled to figure out how to a bring these men home, and b what to do with them at that point Gaaah Such a well written book This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here This might seem like just a history book, but this is ultimately a book on leadership The leadership of Bucher and his subordinates to encourage his men to get through a Hell on Earth, and a failure of the Navy s top brass for getting their men into the mess and then trying to blame Bucher The Navy needsleaders like Commander Lloyd Pete Bucher, who would rather save his crew than send them to slaughter to appeal to the Admiralty s borderline bloodthirsty ego of never giving up a ship, ev This might seem like just a history book, but this is ultimately a book on leadership The leadership of Bucher and his subordinates to encourage his men to get through a Hell on Earth, and a failure of the Navy s top brass for getting their men into the mess and then trying to blame Bucher The Navy needsleaders like Commander Lloyd Pete Bucher, who would rather save his crew than send them to slaughter to appeal to the Admiralty s borderline bloodthirsty ego of never giving up a ship, even if it was given virtually no weapons, no protection, and orders not to incite conflict with hostile forces.You can t look at an online discussion on USS Pueblo without seeing Armchair Admirals and Chicken Hawk sabre rattlers shitblasting the late captain for not ordering his boys to man the three.50 cals that were not only frozen under tarps but not even within range of the North Koreans If you honestly read this book from front to cover and your biggest takeaway is a sense of dishonour from Bucher not needlessly sacrificing his own men, then I hope to Christ almighty that you never get a leadership position This book provides me with solid proof that college professors teach to their own agenda, which I knew but, boy, does this support that I wish I had read this earlier in my semester, so when my professor said, The captives were treated really well until they brought it on themselves towards the end I could have pointed out just how ridiculously biased he was The book itself was interesting the strongest sections were definitely those with the crew The alternating sections describing the po This book provides me with solid proof that college professors teach to their own agenda, which I knew but, boy, does this support that I wish I had read this earlier in my semester, so when my professor said, The captives were treated really well until they brought it on themselves towards the end I could have pointed out just how ridiculously biased he was The book itself was interesting the strongest sections were definitely those with the crew The alternating sections describing the political situations were a bit scattered and the ending dragged on a bit too long Act of War Lyndon Johnson, North Korea, and The Capture of the Spy Ship Pueblo by Jack Cheevers is a well written account of the courage of 83 men whose capture was an embarrassment for the United States and particularly the U.S Navy The eighty three brave members of the crew were ill prepared for attack in international waters by a rogue nation, yet they had been sent to spy on that very nation Their ship was not properly equipped for such a mission and requests to improve the equipment Act of War Lyndon Johnson, North Korea, and The Capture of the Spy Ship Pueblo by Jack Cheevers is a well written account of the courage of 83 men whose capture was an embarrassment for the United States and particularly the U.S Navy The eighty three brave members of the crew were ill prepared for attack in international waters by a rogue nation, yet they had been sent to spy on that very nation Their ship was not properly equipped for such a mission and requests to improve the equipment were denied These men were abandoned by their country to capture by North Korea There they became pawns in diplomatic wrangling, as their captors starved and tortured them Their courage as they endured is only part of the story told in this book The attempts to punish them for losing their ship after their return to the states are disgraceful The military and the bureaucracy argued that 18th century naval standards of civilized behavior should apply to the suffering inflicted by the uncivilized behavior of a brutal regime in the 20th century To write this book, Cheevers faced a lengthy struggle to gather information from people who would prefer that such information be forgotten This is a valuable work and should serve as a stark reminder that we owe it to the people we send into harm s way to protect them Although it is historically referenced as an incident, the seizure of the Pueblo was clearly an act of war perpetrated by a country that remains hostile to the United States today