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If you don t know anything about using DNA to track the historical movement of people, goods and ideas, here s a good place to start Karin Bojs is an experienced science journalist and writes well her look into the development of what Europeans are and where they came from is both personal and universal.The essence of it is clear Europeans are all immigrants, in the end, a mixture of hunterer gatherers who arrived first, the farmers who arrived later and the steppe nomads who were the last t If you don t know anything about using DNA to track the historical movement of people, goods and ideas, here s a good place to start Karin Bojs is an experienced science journalist and writes well her look into the development of what Europeans are and where they came from is both personal and universal.The essence of it is clear Europeans are all immigrants, in the end, a mixture of hunterer gatherers who arrived first, the farmers who arrived later and the steppe nomads who were the last to arrive Mix in some Neanderthal blood in it, and there you go, the variety of Europeans who live in Europe today I won this ARC through a Goodreads giveaway Reading about Ms Bojs scientific journey as she traces her ancestry was very interesting and detailed, though sometimes I found myself a bit overwhelmed by the amount of information given not boring at all, just a little above my head at times.Overall, I am glad I read this book, and my interest in genealogy has peaked a bit. The deputy speaker of the Swedish Parliament, the Sweden Democrat Bj rn S der, has for the second time started a debate about who is Swedish and who is not According to himself, he of course is a pure breed, but Samis and Jews are not.Well, dear Bj rn, I m sorry to inform you that none of us are pure breeds We re all Africans, spiced up with a little Neanderthal.The first Swedes were hunters, and they arrived from the European continent just after the last deglaciation,than 10,000 year The deputy speaker of the Swedish Parliament, the Sweden Democrat Bj rn S der, has for the second time started a debate about who is Swedish and who is not According to himself, he of course is a pure breed, but Samis and Jews are not.Well, dear Bj rn, I m sorry to inform you that none of us are pure breeds We re all Africans, spiced up with a little Neanderthal.The first Swedes were hunters, and they arrived from the European continent just after the last deglaciation,than 10,000 years ago Their hair and skin were dark, and their eyes probably blue A couple of thousand years later the first light skinned and brown eyed farmers arrived from wait for it Syria How does that make you feel, Bj rn Having Syrian genes, I mean Then, about 5,000 years ago a new wave of indoeuropean immigrants came from Central Asia You know, Bj rn, those people you think are superior to others.What about the Samis then The first arrived from northeast just after the deglaciation Then there was a second immigration wave between 2,000 and 3,000 years ago Numerous groups have come since then All have lived side by side and exchanged genes with each other.And Bj rn, if a may ask a personal question My very blonde and blue eyed aunt, who has converted to Judaism is she a real Swede Lesson learned When cultures meet and interact generally great progress is made This was very interesting It seems that DNA research is answering questions deemed unanswerable not that long ago It also raises at least as many new questions, but hey, that s science We are all descended from Mitochondrial Eve who lived in Africa about 200,000 years ago Before Eve people were not like us were not modern humans, not homo sapiens I find it intriguing to wonder what triggered the mutation that gave Eve that slight advantage which, in the end, won out over every other huma This was very interesting It seems that DNA research is answering questions deemed unanswerable not that long ago It also raises at least as many new questions, but hey, that s science We are all descended from Mitochondrial Eve who lived in Africa about 200,000 years ago Before Eve people were not like us were not modern humans, not homo sapiens I find it intriguing to wonder what triggered the mutation that gave Eve that slight advantage which, in the end, won out over every other human type I happened across a lecture on You tube where the answer was aliens Not that surprising, I suppose Maybe it was God, or an accident This story hops forward a bit to 54,000 years ago when some of our ancestors somewhere in the middle east were raped probably by Neanderthals Or maybe they were just into beefy guys I find it exciting to learn that I have at least 2% Neanderthal in me as does everybody else What was also interesting was how, with DNA technique, it is possible to trace the invasion of Europe The native Europeans the Neanderthals disappeared shortly thereafter Shortly, in a relative, prehistory, perspective They had been living here already for over 200,000 years when we arrived, but A second wave of emigrants left the fertile crescent and came wandering up into Europe about 9,000 years ago, bringing bronze, farming, farm animals, ceramics and cats Archaeologists would apparently rather not believe that farming was brought by immigrants assuming rather that the knowledge was passed on culturally, but dead men tell the tale Actually, it s mostly dead women I learnedabout DNA here than I really wanted to know, but it probably did me good And a final wave of immigrants invaders came from the East a mere 5,000 years ago, probably in better boats, riding on horses and speaking an Indo European language Thre are some things I take issue with Ms Bojs interpretation of a rock carving from Vitlycke in which she sees a man holding a hammer, with a lightning bolt in front of him, riding in a cart pulled by a horse, for example I can t say I see it that way Another interpretation is that the cart is drawn by a goat compare the Thor mythology To me the lightning bolt looks like a snake, the hammer seems just to be a disfigured hand and the man seems to have antlers But what do I know I have always thought the boats look like sledges That men were generally erect seems pretty certain and that girls wore pony tails is for sure.The personal side of the story with Ms Bojs travels and meetings was a nice change from the hard facts And at times I find her insights enlightening As in the chapter The Mothers discussing Dawkins The Selfish Gene Rather than selfish genes I would like to speak of double genes Genes may be good or bad, depending on the environment in which they occur They can lead to mental illness or great creativity To ample flesh that allows survival in an austere environment but a risk for overweight when food is in abundance Hyper sensitivity to impressions helps the hunter discover the prey, but can be devastating in classrooms and offices What is good and bad depends on the combination and the context p 414 15, translation by Google and me.The book also contains tips to museums and ancient sites and caves Recommended to all students of human history ( READ DOWNLOAD ) ♰ Min europeiska familj: De senaste 54 000 åren ⚆ The story of Europe and its peoples, told through its genetic legacy and woven together using the latest archaeological findings, will fascinate anyone interested in genealogyKarin Bojs grew up in a small, broken family, and at her mother s funeral she felt this acutely than ever As part of the healing process, she decided to use DNA research to learn about herself, her family, and the interconnectedness of society She went deep in search of her genealogy, having her DNA sequenced and tested, and effectively becoming an experimental subject Remarkably, she was able to trace the path of her ancestors through recorded history and into prehistory Through the course of her research, she met dozens of scientists working in genetic research The narrative travels the length and breadth of Europe, from the Neanderthals of central Germany to the Cro Magnon in France Bojs visited the ancient caves, realizing that her direct ancestors must have been living in the area when the cave art was painted A second DNA analysis later revealed she has Sami ie Lapp genetic material in her genome, and there were further revelations about her hunter gatherer, Bronze Age, and Iron Age relatives, including the Vikings This fresh, first person exploration of genes and genetics goes well beyond personal genealogy and reveals much about the shared history of European peoples When I first picked up this book, I had a different image in mind about what it would be about Perhapsanecdotal, or concerned only with her direct ancestors Maybe it would be a lot of guesswork stipulation.I wasn t expecting her to be a science journalist who interviewed over 70 different researchers and was funded to write this by a leading Swedish journal I also didn t expect to be given such a lovely introduction into DNA archaeology I d never made the connection between DNA arc When I first picked up this book, I had a different image in mind about what it would be about Perhapsanecdotal, or concerned only with her direct ancestors Maybe it would be a lot of guesswork stipulation.I wasn t expecting her to be a science journalist who interviewed over 70 different researchers and was funded to write this by a leading Swedish journal I also didn t expect to be given such a lovely introduction into DNA archaeology I d never made the connection between DNA archaeology before this because I simply didn t think about it This book opened my mind to all the possibilities and benefits this field offers to understanding the history of humankind This book goes way backwaaay back Now I knowabout neanderthals than I did before Really, it was so full of information that it was hard to digest at first The further I got into it, the easier it became to understand Also, I was so fortunate to take a trip to Ireland while reading this book and I got to see some bog bodies for myself I loved looking up all the historic bodies archaeological finds that were cited in the book It was great to have seen the pictures on google and then to see some of the bodies in person at the National Museum I also appreciate that she added in the dangers of racial biology how racists shouldn t stop our understanding of DNA As she quoted in the book, We can t let Hitler dictate what subjects we can research, 50 years on This gave me a great new direction to take my interests in, so hopefully I ll be reading up on burials neanderthals other such matters soon A journalistic account about one person s quest to find out her roots with many interesting details and diversions Too bad that she has managed to speak with P bo but hasn t with David Reich. I found the book fascinating how the author went on a search of her ancestry and traced it so far back by looking at her DNA She takes on a trip of where her ancestors have been by travelling to a number of European countries and interviewing a number of researchers What is interesting is how she explained what life must have been like for the people at that time, what people ate, how they lived Through DNA research it shows that there were three major waves of migration during the ice age, I found the book fascinating how the author went on a search of her ancestry and traced it so far back by looking at her DNA She takes on a trip of where her ancestors have been by travelling to a number of European countries and interviewing a number of researchers What is interesting is how she explained what life must have been like for the people at that time, what people ate, how they lived Through DNA research it shows that there were three major waves of migration during the ice age, when the farmers came from the Middle East, namely Syria, and then the Steppes The migration took place not only on foot but by boat as well.It is interesting how humans had to deal with harsh environments, disease which wiped out 1 2 of the population plagues , enemies, change in diet and how some groups of people were able to survive and pass on their DNA How interesting that some people in Iceland have in their DNA mitochondria belonging to a group descended from an indigenous group in America One thing I thought she should have questioned id the oldest flute found in a cave in Slovenia that has been dismissed as being made by a hyena You do not need to be a researcher to know that if an animal bites a bone it will not make a perfect circle on only one side I very much enjoyed this book even though I m not really used to reading about science in a journalistic style Journalists use many details that are supposed to make the narrativelively like what the weather was or what they were drinking when interviewing a person, or what s the latest gossip about work relationships between researchers going sour I found it redundant and slightly annoying, but there s not too much of it in this book and it did not deter me from reading The main ma I very much enjoyed this book even though I m not really used to reading about science in a journalistic style Journalists use many details that are supposed to make the narrativelively like what the weather was or what they were drinking when interviewing a person, or what s the latest gossip about work relationships between researchers going sour I found it redundant and slightly annoying, but there s not too much of it in this book and it did not deter me from reading The main matter is fascinating, and the author s rich imagination was a boost to my own there are several imagined scenes of our prehistorical ancestors travels and meetings, which make the whole story muchalive I did get lost in some of the terminology in the end couldn t possibly remember the names of all haplogroups, them being just strings of seemingly random numbers and letters but that didn t affect my ability to follow the arguments as the narrative is otherwise very accessible to an amateur reader Last but not least, the author s sensitivity to the beauty of landscapes shines throughout the book and makes the whole reading experience that muchreal Thank you, Karin, I ve had a great time with your book I gave up at about 1 3 of the way through Even though the science is very interesting and a favorite topic of mine, the translation isn t very good and makes for poor reading I was reading it as a e book May pick it back up in print to see if that helps.