(((Book))) ☟ The Fall of Rome ☠ PDF eBook or Kindle ePUB free

Beautiful, serene and sad, think Dead Poets Society meets Go Tell it on the Mountain A first novel which is remarkable If you have a thing for novels movies about inspirational teachers but also get the difficulties of teaching and working in education itself, I cannot recommend this book enough. (((Book))) ↠ The Fall of Rome ✘ Latin instructor Jerome Washington is a man out of place The lone African American teacher at the Chelsea School, an elite all boys boarding school in Connecticut, he has spent nearly two decades trying not to appear too racial So he is unnerved when Rashid Bryson, a promising black inner city student who is new to the school, seeks Washington as a potential ally against Chelsea s citadel of white privilege Preferring not to align himself with Bryson, Washington rejects the boy s friendship Surprised and dismayed by Washington s response, Bryson turns instead to Jana Hansen, a middle aged white divorc e who is also new to the school and who has her own reasons for becoming involved in the lives of both Bryson and Washington Southgate makes her debut as a writer to watch in this compelling, provocative tale of how race and class ensnare Hansen, Washington, and Bryson as they journey toward an inevitable and ultimately tragic confrontation Thank you Roberta Gardner for recommending this study in race and social class brilliantly portrayed in a 3 voiced story that I could not put down The setting is at elite Connecticut boys school, Chelsea, mid 1990s Their voices and lives intersect in unexpected ways, yet remain distinctive Jerome Washington, Latin instructor I have been the only Negro on the faculty A note I am fully aware that Negro is no longer the fashionable term It is, however, the term I prefer to use.When I was Thank you Roberta Gardner for recommending this study in race and social class brilliantly portrayed in a 3 voiced story that I could not put down The setting is at elite Connecticut boys school, Chelsea, mid 1990s Their voices and lives intersect in unexpected ways, yet remain distinctive Jerome Washington, Latin instructor I have been the only Negro on the faculty A note I am fully aware that Negro is no longer the fashionable term It is, however, the term I prefer to use.When I was hired, the headmastersaid, It s time that the Chelsea School took note of the advances your people have madeI know you ll take this in the spirit in which it s intended you re truly a credit to your race I did take Hays s comment as the compliment he meant it to be though i suppose many would not have Rashid Bryson, first year Black student with limited financial means from NYC The schoolwork at Chelsea was so muchdense and intricate than anything he d ever down before He felt that eyes were on him every second, here, back home, everywhere everything weighed on him.It seemed as though he d learned almost nothingJokes he didn t get because he didn t know who some snowboard was Seeing a picture of this bearded German guy, Freud, and being the only one who didn t recognize him interestingly, his chapters are always in 3rd person while the other two speak in first person Jana Hansen, White English teacher coming from years of public school teaching in Cleveland on learning that one of her Cleveland students had been arrested How could i have not known about his other life Not his other life His life And how close he was to throwing it away even as i thought I was doing him some goodSomething about Jason that smile he gave me the last time i saw him, the way he worked so hard to understand what he was reading made losing him worseI got one postcard from Jason All it said was, Im Sorry I didn t write back What was I going to say This is a rather compelling novel about three characters who live at the margins of the elite by being in an an all boys school for the wealthy and priveleged, with some lower class kids added in to secure school funding Jerome Washington, Latin Classics teacher, Negro, as he likes to call himself, can be said to be part of that affirmative action Rashid Bryson, decades later, is also there for the same reason The difference between the two, and really the whole point of the book, is how This is a rather compelling novel about three characters who live at the margins of the elite by being in an an all boys school for the wealthy and priveleged, with some lower class kids added in to secure school funding Jerome Washington, Latin Classics teacher, Negro, as he likes to call himself, can be said to be part of that affirmative action Rashid Bryson, decades later, is also there for the same reason The difference between the two, and really the whole point of the book, is how they view themselves vis a vis this rarified world Washington is very much a modern Booker T Washington, if such a thing exists He really feels that helping out those who look like him denegrates his accomplishments and creates slackers who don t appreciate the opportunities they are given He is a traditional, make no waves, work until they appreciate you type of black man, much like Booker T Bryson comes into the school overwhelmed by a system that is set to cater to those who have come from great homes with parents who read to them Rashid feels the pressure of succeeding in this environment and finds that Mr Washington is not on his side Rashid is an affront to how Jerome lives his life Rashid refuses to keep his head low, his concerns to himself He struggles with the weight of it, made worse by Washington s passive aggressive attacks on him It is a tragic tale of a man who constructed a vision of himself that did not jibe with reality Jerome can think that the world will see him as an individual, free of racial implication, but the only way to achieve that, as he finds out, is to have no real connections to others at all A really good read, although I find Jerome s outcome to be rather unsympathetic, and at times, unjustly so I love the fact that you get to experience this story through three different perspectives It brings a lot of racial issues out for discussion without being too aggressive about it I will admit I cried several times while reading from Rashid s point of view It s worth the read. So I have been reading a lot of books about outsiders at prep schools as of late This is almost the best of the books that I have read, but I am still conflicted about the book First, I have to admit that it was a compelling read, there were moments when I really did not want to put it down Second, I think her choice of creating an antagonism between an inner city African American boy and the only African American member of the faculty was an inspired one Which leads us into my largest probl So I have been reading a lot of books about outsiders at prep schools as of late This is almost the best of the books that I have read, but I am still conflicted about the book First, I have to admit that it was a compelling read, there were moments when I really did not want to put it down Second, I think her choice of creating an antagonism between an inner city African American boy and the only African American member of the faculty was an inspired one Which leads us into my largest problem with the book Though the choice for a central conflict was an inspired one, her characterization of Jerome Williams, the aforementioned teacher, was flat and at best two dimensional By the end, the character was unbelievably absurd I couldn t help but feeling that the central message of her novel was African Americans with aconservative outlook on racial relations are inherently damaged and in grave danger of a psychological implosion The novel flirts with and then seemingly discards that idea that African Americans can derive great meaning from cultural traditions other than their own Perhaps I am taking this all a bit too personally because I am an African American teacher in an independent school who teaches a Western Civilization course that focuses heavily on the classical tradition At any rate, this struck me as a good book that could have very well been great This is why I read books I was about to dismiss this book because of its title Then I considered what I would have titled it otherwise I m not quite sure, because you wouldn t want to sell it cheap The revolving perspectives in each chapter is an interesting device I found it intriguing that the author chose first person for some of the characters but third for the young man The examination of both race and class issues was handled thoughtfully It felt like a movie at some points in tha This is why I read books I was about to dismiss this book because of its title Then I considered what I would have titled it otherwise I m not quite sure, because you wouldn t want to sell it cheap The revolving perspectives in each chapter is an interesting device I found it intriguing that the author chose first person for some of the characters but third for the young man The examination of both race and class issues was handled thoughtfully It felt like a movie at some points in that I was casting actors from The Wire as the main characters Lance Reddick and Tristan Wilds The character of the Caucasian woman was compelling as the author is African American Usually, Caucasian attempt to write from the perspective of African Americans I thought Southgate was successful in capturing the voice of a middle class, middle aged divorcee I enjoyed this book I found the author s choice to tell the story through the eyes of three separate characters effective Each of the three characters including a black teenager, a black male teacher and a white female teacher experienced the events in the book differently as filtered by their unique life experiences I had not heard of this author before reading an August 12th review of Katherine Stockett s The Help This review included a short piece written by Ms Southgate It was less than I enjoyed this book I found the author s choice to tell the story through the eyes of three separate characters effective Each of the three characters including a black teenager, a black male teacher and a white female teacher experienced the events in the book differently as filtered by their unique life experiences I had not heard of this author before reading an August 12th review of Katherine Stockett s The Help This review included a short piece written by Ms Southgate It was less than complimentary of Ms Stockett s novel on many levels Her comments made me want to read this novel which also dealt with race relations but in contemporary times rather than in the midst of the civil rights movement of the early sixties.I recommend this book and also plan to check out the author s next novel, The Taste of Salt This book was so powerful Being that Jerome had just transferred to a new school, he was completely shy He didn t fit in naturally, and ultimately he wasn t as comfortable with his surroundings However, one trait that I am thankful Martha Southgate highlighted is Jerome s perseverance No matter what transpired and how doubtful Jerome had gotten, he never fell prey to his situation definitely made lemonade out of the lemons that life had given him Good job Mrs.Martha Southgate for a wonder This book was so powerful Being that Jerome had just transferred to a new school, he was completely shy He didn t fit in naturally, and ultimately he wasn t as comfortable with his surroundings However, one trait that I am thankful Martha Southgate highlighted is Jerome s perseverance No matter what transpired and how doubtful Jerome had gotten, he never fell prey to his situation definitely made lemonade out of the lemons that life had given him Good job Mrs.Martha Southgate for a wonderful success story I would recommend this book to anyone who struggles with fitting in and adapting to new situations outside of normal comfort zones This was a most unusual novel about an all boys boarding school.I found this writer s style engrossing.I m very glad that I read this book.