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[[ Download Ebook ]] ¶ Hannibal Crosses the Alps: The Invasion of Italy & the Second Punic War × When he left his Spanish base one spring day inBC with his , man army of mercenaries, officers, and elephants, Hannibal was launching not just the main offensive of the Second Punic War but also one of the great military journeys in ancient history His masterful advance through rough terrain and fierce Celtic tribes proved his worth as a leader, but it was his extraordinary passage through the Alps still considered treacherous even by modern climbers that made him a legend John Prevas combines rigorous research of ancient sources with his own excursions through the icy peaks to bring to life this awesome trek, solving the centuries old question of Hannibal s exact route and shedding fresh light on the cultures of Rome and Carthage along the way Here is the finest kind of history, sure to appeal to readers of Steven Pressfield s Gates of Firealive with grand strategy, the clash of empires, fabulous courage, and the towering figure of Hannibal Barca Again I am biased by the fact of the subject matter If I were to be required to pick a specialized area of Military History, the Second Punic War would probably be it So for your average reader, pretend I only rated it four stars lol The book, rather short, is also much longer than really needed, the author repeating himself, well, repeatedly, while the quality of the maps that are to support his alternate views on where Hannibal crossed the alps are lacking That said, it s still a thoroughly entertaining book.A few tidbitsRomulus was actually the grandson of Aeneas, according to roman myth the founder of Rome Aeneas, after fleeing Troy, Ilium, having been defeated by mainland Greeks, and after spending a year in Cartha The book, rather short, is also much longer than really needed, the author repeating himself, well, repeatedly, while the quality of the maps that are to support his alternate views on where Hannibal crossed the alps are lacking That said, it s still a thoroughly entertaining book.A few tidbitsRomulus was actually the grandson of Aeneas, according to roman myth the founder of Rome Aeneas, after fleeing Troy, Ilium, having been defeated by mainland Greeks, and after spending a year in Carthage, cavorting with the legendary queen founder of Carthage, Dido, herself having fled Tyre after her husband had been murdered by her ambitious brother, arrived in Rome to try his luck anew And, incidentally, this foundation story is part of the reason Romans had a love hate relationship with Greece, Troy having been defeated by the brothers from across the Adriatic The long arm of history is fascinating After Carthage lost the first Punic war and their colonies in Sicily, a defeated Carthage saw Rome also take control of Corsica and Sardinia Then, nursing themselves back to health, Hannibal s father Hamilcar, convinced the Carthaginian senate to move into Spain, both to be able to pay their remunerations to Rome and to rebuild their empire in preparation for revenge for the defeat Hamilcar suffered in Sicily after the Carthaginian senate told him to withdraw.Over many years, Hamilcar effectively carved out his own personal empire in Spain, submitting the Celtic, Iberian and Celtoiberian tribes to his and Carthaginian control On one outing, Hamilcar and two of his sons were cut off from the main force Hamilcar ordered his sons to take a particular route to evade capture, while he himself was going to take adangerous course, in the hope of diverting the enemy forces and save his sons His sons were saved, including his oldest, Hannibal, still too young to take over from his father, but Hamilcar was killed in action.Hamilcar s son in law took over as commander in Spain Deploying punitive raids on the tribes responsible for the death of his father in law, Hasdrubal ended up extending control of the peninsula, submittingtribes to his rule and increasing the family s riches.In the process, Hasdrubal founded the capital of the dominion of the Barca family on the south coast of Spain, New Carthage, Carthago Nova, now Carthagena.Now, when the spaniards ventured into South America some 1700 years later, one of their cities in the new world was named after Carthagena, itself named after, what was until the Romans finally defeated the Carthaginians at the end of the third Punic war, the most important power in the Mediterranean, Carthage, a city that, by the time Carthagena was founded in modern day Bolivia, had ceased to exist forthan one and a half millennia.Salient detail, Carthago derives from the Punic for new city , that is, the new Tyre, meaning that Carthagena in Colombia is like the new new new city Or new new new rock, as Tyre derives from the Phoenician for rock.Alexander s conquering of Asia took his men on a 10 year round trip of the Persian empire, conquering it completely in the process Hannibal took his men across the Pyrenees and then the alps, the Romans eventually refusing to engage him at the gates of Rome itself, after devastating campaigns in northern Italy The men that did return with him only did so after an unbelievable seventeen years.Hannibal had soldiers from the Belearics in his army They had slingers for weapons, also the root for the name of the group of islands These Belearics slingers didn t demand payment in coin or gold, but in captured women.Barcelona derives from the Punic for camp of the Barcas , Barca being hannibal s family name.Also fascinating is Hannibal s life story after almost two decades fighting in Italy, missing perhaps two opportunities of taking Rome itself, which would have completely changed the history of the world.After Rome eventually controlled Spain, Hannibal was called back to Carthage to protect the city against a Roman attack Eventually, Rome was able to enforce a treaty quite unfavorable to Carthage However, Hannibal remained and even became consul for a while, introducing a number of democratizing measures in the city state.True or not, Hannibal was then accused of again plotting against the Romans, after which he first fled to the eastern Mediterranean to offer his services in fighting Rome, there, eventually unsuccessful, continuing his objective in southern turkey There, too, the Romans eventually defeated him, demanding his personal surrender Instead, Hannibal chose to kill himself by taking poison, at the age of 64 Starred Review in Booklist Hannibal s crossing of the Alps and subsequent invasion and ravaging of Italy during the Second Punic War is one of the greatest epics in all of ancient history It is a story replete with high drama, immense human suffering, endurance, strategic brilliance, and stupidity born of arrogance Prevas, a historian and lecturer in classical Greek, retells the saga in a compact, superbly written volume with some provocative conclusi Starred Review in Booklist Hannibal s crossing of the Alps and subsequent invasion and ravaging of Italy during the Second Punic War is one of the greatest epics in all of ancient history It is a story replete with high drama, immense human suffering, endurance, strategic brilliance, and stupidity born of arrogance Prevas, a historian and lecturer in classical Greek, retells the saga in a compact, superbly written volume with some provocative conclusions, particularly concerning the actual route that Hannibal used to break through the Alps His insights into the political machinations in Carthage that led to Hannibal s decision to invade are fascinating His depiction of Hannibal s struggles, military and diplomatic, with the warlike Celtic tribes that hindered his march sheds light on an often neglected aspect of the campaign The descriptions of the key battles in Italy, particularly at Lake Trasimene and Cannae, are presented in a cogent manner that can easily be followed by nonspecialists With this excellent work, Prevas proves that a grand story is well worth retelling Jay Freeman The subtitle of this books is The Invasion of Italy and the Punic Wars, but the book is not limited to only those subjects While the book concentrates at least half of the roughly 200 pages on Hannibal s Alp crossing from Gaul France to Italy, we also get a history of Hannibal s family and the city state of Carthage, plus much history of Ancient Rome, mainly in relation to their arch rival, Carthage.The author begins the book with a brief summary of all three Punic Wars, then he describes the The subtitle of this books is The Invasion of Italy and the Punic Wars, but the book is not limited to only those subjects While the book concentrates at least half of the roughly 200 pages on Hannibal s Alp crossing from Gaul France to Italy, we also get a history of Hannibal s family and the city state of Carthage, plus much history of Ancient Rome, mainly in relation to their arch rival, Carthage.The author begins the book with a brief summary of all three Punic Wars, then he describes the founding myths of Carthage and Rome, and then explains the hostility between them We learn of archeological and linguistic evidence about the rivals, and how both societies functioned, and how they grew from small settlements to trading superpowers.Sadism is a running theme in the story of the two empires I won t get into all that sickness here, but be prepared for it if you want to study this history institutionalized sadism from slavery to crucifixions to torture to infanticide The 150 years described in this book is connected by a string of barbarities committed by both sides of the conflict.This is really a book for Hannibal historians to indulge in their fantasies of following along as Hannibal moved his military forces including his famous elephants from southern Spain, up the coast of Spain, passing into Gaul France , traversing Gaul to the French Alps, and then maneuvering a difficult Alpine pass, past savage Celtic tribes, descending into Italy s Po Valley, and continuing on for nearly two decades through the rest of the Italian peninsula.The prose is not always smooth, and there is some repetition The painstaking detail of the Alpine trip might be tedious for some readers The events after the Alp crossing are condensed in the final sixth of the book But the author does make his central thesis clear the battles with Carthage forced taught Rome to learn to become the world power that would dominate the Mediterranean and beyond for centuries to come.Please read my full and illustrated review at Italophile Book Reviews.http italophilebookreviews.blogspot