*Read Pdf ⚣ Daredevil Visionaries: Frank Miller, Vol. 1 × eBook or Kindle ePUB free

*Read Pdf º Daredevil Visionaries: Frank Miller, Vol. 1 ⚠ All the elements that made Miller s tenure on Daredevil a comic noir classic are here gritty, street level action, moody atmosphere, and widescreen adventure told with a cinematic eyeThe stories in this volume feature unforgettable characters like the Kingpin, the mammoth king of the New York Underworld Bullseye, the deranged but deadly assassin Elektra, the woman Daredevil loves but is forced to oppose and, of course, Daredevil himself, blind as justice, he is an attorney by day and an urban vigilante by night Also introduced in this collection is the mysterious ninja brotherhood, The Hand, the group that will ultimately cause Elektra s untimely demiseThe stories included in the volume dedicated to Frank Miller s classic work show the continued development of an artistic legend as his skills continued to grow in stature and depth The title here is really misleading, as this is NOT where Miller s true run begins However, this is where he began doing art on the series, so it s collected for posterity It s really not part of the saga as a whole though You can completely skip it, and probably should It s pretty hokey generic stuff common to the period Volume 2 is where Miller really shook things up. 2.0 to 2.5 stars Contains Frank Miller s first work on Daredevil artwork only as he did not take over the writing until later Okay, but not on the level of the later work when Miller took over the writing duties. Really, this volume is the prelude to Frank Miller s run on Daredevil It s primarily authored by Roger McKenzie, who worked across the industry from about 1976 1982 before disappearing as quickly as he appeared Frank Miller simply does the art and gets a co author credit for the last three issues, the last of which is written by David Micheline instead of McKenzie.With the exception of the fairly awful Micheline issue 167 , this volume is much better than you d expect a late 70s mainstrea Really, this volume is the prelude to Frank Miller s run on Daredevil It s primarily authored by Roger McKenzie, who worked across the industry from about 1976 1982 before disappearing as quickly as he appeared Frank Miller simply does the art and gets a co author credit for the last three issues, the last of which is written by David Micheline instead of McKenzie.With the exception of the fairly awful Micheline issue 167 , this volume is much better than you d expect a late 70s mainstream comic to be There s a two parter with Bullseye that focuses on his hatred and fear of Daredevil 160 161 and a story with the Hulk 163 that moves far beyond being a simply fistfight to Matt s relief Best of all, though, is the continuing subplot with Ben Urich, where he finally reveals his knowledge of Matt s identity in issue 164 Though the story is a bit rough by modern standards, it s still a great plot direction and a moving look at Ben s character Beyond that, these comics have a strong and extensive supporting cast, who gets lots of attention So, this isn t the greatness that would follow as Miller entirely took over the comic, but it s still a goodness that makes it really readable in the modern day, and thus a nice setup to Miller s run proper For the comic art fan, and Frank Miller fans, this volume of Daredevil stories is a must have This is early Miller art with brilliant splashes of Gil Kane and Steve Ditko Perhaps even a few hints of Will Eisner Miller s art is fluid and dark, aided in no small part by the inking of Klaus Janson It gives the city the gritty texture it deserves, especially in light of his writing in the following volume The writing in this volume is by Roger McKenzie, a capable writer but not one who has made For the comic art fan, and Frank Miller fans, this volume of Daredevil stories is a must have This is early Miller art with brilliant splashes of Gil Kane and Steve Ditko Perhaps even a few hints of Will Eisner Miller s art is fluid and dark, aided in no small part by the inking of Klaus Janson It gives the city the gritty texture it deserves, especially in light of his writing in the following volume The writing in this volume is by Roger McKenzie, a capable writer but not one who has made a splash in the industry Miller does have one or two co plotting credits in this volume, but if you want story to be on the same level as the art, better to start with volume 2