~READ PDF ♻ Meltdown Iceland: Lessons on the World Financial Crisis from a Small Bankrupt Island ♩ PDF or E-pub free

~READ PDF ♵ Meltdown Iceland: Lessons on the World Financial Crisis from a Small Bankrupt Island ♃ The compelling and authoritative story of the financial destruction of Iceland a saga that mirrors, in microcosm, the forces that caused the global economic crisis The economic crisis that emerged in America inunleashed a veritable epidemic of ill health around the world However it was Iceland, whose population of three hundred thousand had the world s highe I feel bad for really liking a book about my home base going bankrupt so I must say that I do not like the fact that Iceland went bankrupt but I do like the fact that Roger Boyes wrote this book Boyes interviewed people from politicians to the local fisherman and explained the meltdown in Iceland, in my opinion, to the best of his ability I am at the start of my third year of living in Reykjav k, Iceland I was born and raised in the United States of America The USA is my native land, my homel I feel bad for really liking a book about my home base going bankrupt so I must say that I do not like the fact that Iceland went bankrupt but I do like the fact that Roger Boyes wrote this book Boyes interviewed people from politicians to the local fisherman and explained the meltdown in Iceland, in my opinion, to the best of his ability I am at the start of my third year of living in Reykjav k, Iceland I was born and raised in the United States of America The USA is my native land, my homeland I began referring to Iceland as my home base jokingly mainly because I travel a lot but I now refer to Iceland as a base because as a foreigner that is what it is, my home base I love both and both drive me crazy at times I translate the Icelandic media on my computer A translation is hard to read The meaning is lost I end up reading a translation of someone s perspective that may or may not be influenced by the subject I rarely understand what is being written here So when I saw a book by Roger Boyes from the Times of London titled Meltdown Iceland I was shocked that was fast and excited written in English Not translated At the very least, I would catch what he was saying I would understand the perspective I was reading So I read it Could not put it down The book is well written and easy to read I found it interesting to read about the names I have heard and still hear so often as well as what was driving the capitalist forces Boyes appeared to have one agenda explain how it happened To explain how an entire country went bankrupt I would have liked to have heardabout Au ur Capital and how the firm went unscathed The simple truth that Au ur does not invest in what they do not understand says a lot and I know Boyes was sticking to his agenda One may not agree with his findings One may think it is negative to air the dirty laundry Especially to air it in English One may find it hard to follow if not Icelandic or have never lived in Iceland But it is worth the read No matter if this is what happened or not there are lessons for us all in this book Not just lessons for Icleanders Lessons that deserve attention from us all I certainly paid attention I m not really much of a finance wonk, but I was interested in this book because I visited Iceland the day the people threw out all the politicians who caused the nation s financial collapse and elected a whole new administration And, knowing some Icelanders personally, I was interested to read what an outsider thought of the whole fiasco I also enjoyed references to places in Iceland that I ve seen I was a bit worried that this book would be full of all kinds of boring financial stuff, but I m not really much of a finance wonk, but I was interested in this book because I visited Iceland the day the people threw out all the politicians who caused the nation s financial collapse and elected a whole new administration And, knowing some Icelanders personally, I was interested to read what an outsider thought of the whole fiasco I also enjoyed references to places in Iceland that I ve seen I was a bit worried that this book would be full of all kinds of boring financial stuff, but it was really interesting The author really got into the people behind the collapse what motivated them, what went wrong, etc It really was fascinating kind of like a soap opera Sadly, the results of the collapse were no fantasy The author makes the point that seeing what happened in a small country total population is just over 300,000 makes it easier to grasp what went wrong world wide And I have to say that I have a much better understanding of what caused the global financial collapse after reading this.The book was short, and very easy to read not dull or boring, which was a relief Certainly, it s a niche market book, but anyone who is interested in understanding what happened, without having to wade through pages of graphs numbers would get a lot out of this book Plus you really get to understand the Icelandic psyche So, I quite enjoyed it Outstanding, readable, thematically strong and nuanced account of the Icelandic boom and bust by a veteran correspondent with the Financial Times Boyes makes a strong case for the Icelandic chapter of the global crash being metaphor, microcosm and case study, but goes beyond that to point tantalizingly at a separate set of issues around the role of small states, cultures and enterprises in a network scaled, globalized world they re screwed is his basic conclusion Lower ratings on Goodreads Outstanding, readable, thematically strong and nuanced account of the Icelandic boom and bust by a veteran correspondent with the Financial Times Boyes makes a strong case for the Icelandic chapter of the global crash being metaphor, microcosm and case study, but goes beyond that to point tantalizingly at a separate set of issues around the role of small states, cultures and enterprises in a network scaled, globalized world they re screwed is his basic conclusion Lower ratings on Goodreads seem to come from people with either very high or very low economic literacy I found it just right Wohoo I won a copy of this from the Goodreads Giveaways section thanks for telling about that, Emily Granted, I entered the giveaway for this bookfor Ryan than for me he ll be thrilled but I ll flip through it too Premise of the book, from the preface I want to show the human narrative to this international meltdown, that we Icelanders and non Icelanders alike are not just powerless victims caught in the spokes of the vast machinery of capitalism Boyes presents Iceland a Wohoo I won a copy of this from the Goodreads Giveaways section thanks for telling about that, Emily Granted, I entered the giveaway for this bookfor Ryan than for me he ll be thrilled but I ll flip through it too Premise of the book, from the preface I want to show the human narrative to this international meltdown, that we Icelanders and non Icelanders alike are not just powerless victims caught in the spokes of the vast machinery of capitalism Boyes presents Iceland as a small scale, understandable example of what has happened in the worldwide financial crisis.I expected a really boring textbook read, but this is surprisingly well written I guess I shouldn t say surprisingly according to the back of the book, Roger Boyes has reported for the Financial Timesand Timesof London for 30 years Still, I thought he did a great job of pulling in historical tidbits to explain the country s mentality, and using non economic stories to explain what was happening in the financial sector. Very interesting take on the background to the financial crisis of 2008 although as the book was published in 2009, it was quite soon after the events so lacks the perspective which a bittime would give This book goes into quite a lot of detail about the personalities and relationships in the Icelandic political and financial scene It s about Iceland, but it is also about the rest of the Western world Iceland is small and the problems therefore seem magnified in a small society, but t Very interesting take on the background to the financial crisis of 2008 although as the book was published in 2009, it was quite soon after the events so lacks the perspective which a bittime would give This book goes into quite a lot of detail about the personalities and relationships in the Icelandic political and financial scene It s about Iceland, but it is also about the rest of the Western world Iceland is small and the problems therefore seem magnified in a small society, but there are parallels with what was going on elsewhere I am now a bit better informed as to why so much of the British high street ended up in the hands of a very few Icelanders The historical background helps to explain the post crash hostility to Britain and the over sensitivity to criticism which led to various early warnings being ignored it doesn t really explain why so many British institutions went along with it, as the warnings were there, but it was, as he says, bubble behaviour I also like the way Icelandic myth, literature, and geography occasionally make an appearance to explain financial practices The long hand of Margaret Thatcher seems to have stretched a long way north, surprisingly were foreign nations really so taken in by her shallow ideas Lots of lessons here for the UK, and for Iceland too if it is ready to accept them It would be interesting to have an update four years on A very informative book but not an easy read This one took me a very long time to finish mostly because it contains so many facts, figures, and dates I will probably need to read it again sometime to help myself digest all of the information.One thing that impressed me was how, at least for me, it can be easy to get lost in the enormity of our current economic crisis A trillion or even a billion dollars means very little in real terms to most This book focuses on Iceland, with a much smaller A very informative book but not an easy read This one took me a very long time to finish mostly because it contains so many facts, figures, and dates I will probably need to read it again sometime to help myself digest all of the information.One thing that impressed me was how, at least for me, it can be easy to get lost in the enormity of our current economic crisis A trillion or even a billion dollars means very little in real terms to most This book focuses on Iceland, with a much smaller economy, and puts the perspective on a smaller scale which helps the reader makesense of it all Additionally, it is a stark reminder of how much the global economy relies on sane and responsible practices of all countries, and particularly a large one such as the United States, to keep the world from falling off a financial cliff Terrific book on the Icelandic financial collapse Having now visited Iceland and reported on its financial and political doings, I am evenimpressed with this book by Roger Boyes For anyone wanting to understand the Icelandic financial collapse, this is a great place to start Boyes breaks it down in a way that is both clear and entertaining.Jake BernsteinJournalist, Author Author of Secrecy World Inside the Panama Papers Investigation of Illicit Money Networks and the Global Elite htt Terrific book on the Icelandic financial collapse Having now visited Iceland and reported on its financial and political doings, I am evenimpressed with this book by Roger Boyes For anyone wanting to understand the Icelandic financial collapse, this is a great place to start Boyes breaks it down in a way that is both clear and entertaining.Jake BernsteinJournalist, Author Author of Secrecy World Inside the Panama Papers Investigation of Illicit Money Networks and the Global Elite Capitalism is a rather strange animal In our times, at least, it seems to shun introspection and just roll the dice That happened in the United States, with the proliferation of financial instruments that were imperfectly understood and, apparently, based on nothing but a combination of arrant egomania and butterfly wings Meltdown Iceland Lessons on the World Financial Crisis from a Small Bankrupt Island is one of those journalistic books that is a good summary of what happened after the Capitalism is a rather strange animal In our times, at least, it seems to shun introspection and just roll the dice That happened in the United States, with the proliferation of financial instruments that were imperfectly understood and, apparently, based on nothing but a combination of arrant egomania and butterfly wings Meltdown Iceland Lessons on the World Financial Crisis from a Small Bankrupt Island is one of those journalistic books that is a good summary of what happened after the fact but without the contribution of the politicians and oligarchs who caused the whole mess They, of course, have no particular insights but the desire to maintain as much of their ill gotten gains as possible through the bad times to follow Roger Boyes has produced a book of some interest and some moderate insight But I ask, how long will it take before there is another bubble comparable to Iceland s banking bubble or the real estate bubble in the U.S A few years, perhaps You can be sure that, when it happens, the next batch of politico oligarchs will, of course, think that, for them, everything will be golden and unerringly lucky The dice will roll again and again and again.My favorite quote comes from the Icelandic novelist Einar Mar Gundmundsson A cannibal is flying in first class The flight attendant brings a menu with several options The cannibal is quite polite, as cannibals often are upon first impression The cannibal scans the menu and then says to the flight attendant, I don t see anything appetizing on the menu Would you be a dear and fetch me the passenger list The comparison is apt Those who have attained the height of political or economic power are not the most caring of people Why otherwise would they like reading Ayn Rand Written by a writer for financial news, this is an interesting retrospective on the failure of Iceland s banks in 2008 Why do we hear the same story over and over The government privatizes resources and removes oversight, a small group of oligarchs snap them up to serve their own purposes, and then go international to swindle as many small people as possible I need to do some research on what has happened since, but yet another cautionary tale on the manipulation of the market and resources Written by a writer for financial news, this is an interesting retrospective on the failure of Iceland s banks in 2008 Why do we hear the same story over and over The government privatizes resources and removes oversight, a small group of oligarchs snap them up to serve their own purposes, and then go international to swindle as many small people as possible I need to do some research on what has happened since, but yet another cautionary tale on the manipulation of the market and resources by a few powerful rich people Guest starring Dick Fuld